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Examples of Absolute Pressure Of Gases, Liquids And Solids With Definition And Units In Detail

We express that what are the examples of absolute pressure of gases, solid and liquids with units and definition to better understand. Lets Read…

Definition of Absolute Pressure

Absolute pressure is that at which a substance or a geographical point is found , in relation to absolute zero . It is the true pressure because it takes into account the atmospheric pressure and also the pressure that is being exerted. Its value is the one that is applied in the laboratory experimental calculations to have an accurate result.

To calculate the absolute pressure, the atmospheric pressure and the pressure in the system, either hydrostatic or gauge, are added:

Absolute pressure = Gauge pressure + Atmospheric pressure

Absolute pressure = Hydrostatic pressure + Atmospheric pressure

What are the units of absolute pressure?

The units of measurement for absolute pressure are the same as those used for all types of pressure:

  • Atmospheres (atm)
  • Bars (bar)
  • Pascals (Pa)
  • Millimeters of mercury (mmHg)
  • Pounds over square inch (psi)
  • Kilogram force over square centimeter (kgf / cm 2 )

Absolute pressure in gases

The gases exert pressure against the walls of the container that contains them. This pressure is called gauge pressure, and it exists inside tanks, balloons, or tires, for example. It can be measured by means of devices called manometers. To obtain the absolute pressure of a gas, atmospheric pressure is added to the gauge pressure. examples of absolute pressure

Absolute pressure = Gauge pressure + Atmospheric pressure

Atmospheric pressure is that of the environment and can be measured with devices such as the barometer or the aneroid barograph . Its value will be the one that marks the reading, and will be different every day according to the weather conditions.

The gauge pressure can be higher or lower than atmospheric. When it is lower, it is said to be a vacuum pressure . It is the one found in deflated balloons or vacuum food packaging. In that case, the absolute pressure would be slightly higher than atmospheric.

Absolute pressure in gasesAbsolute pressure in liquids

Liquids exert pressure when they are at rest, contained in a container. It is due to their weight and the height they comprise within the walls. It is called hydrostatic pressure, and atmospheric pressure is added to obtain absolute pressure, because the latter also acts on the surface of the liquid.

Absolute pressure = Hydrostatic pressure + Atmospheric pressure

Substituting the formula for hydrostatic pressure H = ρ * g * h is:

Pabs = ρ * g * h + Patm

Pabs = H + Patm

When there are two or more liquids inside the container, the hydrostatic pressure will be the accumulated pressure of all of them. In the end, the pressures that will act on the bottom of the container will be hydrostatic and atmospheric. That is the absolute pressure.

Absolute pressure in liquids

Absolute pressure in solids

Solids exert pressure due to their weight and the area covered by their geometry. This will be accompanied by atmospheric pressure, which influences its surface and accumulates above the ground. To calculate the absolute pressure, the sum is made:

Absolute pressure = Pressure + Atmosphere pressure

Substituting the pressure formula P = F / A , it remains:

Pabs = (F / A) + Patm

Absolute pressure in solids

Examples of absolute pressure

Example 1

Calculate the absolute pressure when the pressure is 240 Pascals. The atmospheric pressure that is taken into account is the standard one: 101325 Pascals.

Pabs = P + Patm

Pabs = (240 Pa) + 101325 Pa

Pabs = 101565 Pa

Example 2

Calculate the absolute pressure when the pressure is 289 Pascals. The atmospheric pressure that is taken into account is the standard one: 101325 Pascals.

Pabs = P + Patm

Pabs = (289 Pa) + 101325 Pa

Pabs = 101614 Pa

Example 3

Calculate the absolute pressure when the pressure is 264 Pascals. The atmospheric pressure taken into account is the standard one: 101325 Pascals.

Pabs = P + Patm

Pabs = (264 Pa) + 101325 Pa

Pabs = 101589 Pa

Example 4

Calculate the absolute pressure when the pressure is 153 Pascals. The atmospheric pressure that is taken into account is the standard one: 101325 Pascals.

Pabs = P + Patm

Pabs = (153 Pa) + 101325 Pa

Pabs = 101478 Pa

Example 5

Calculate the absolute pressure when the hydrostatic pressure is 5028 Pascals. The atmospheric pressure that is taken into account is the standard one: 101325 Pascals.

Pabs = H + Patm

Pabs = (5028 Pa) + (101325 Pa)

Pabs = 106353 Pa

Example 6

Calculate the absolute pressure when the hydrostatic pressure is 2,015 bar. The atmospheric pressure that is taken into account is the standard one: 1,013 bar.

Pabs = H + Patm

Pabs = (2,015 bar) + (1,013 bar)

Pabs = 3.028 bar

Example 7

Calculate the absolute pressure when the hydrostatic pressure is 4.5 bar. The atmospheric pressure that is taken into account is the standard one: 1,013 bar.

Pabs = H + Patm

Pabs = (4.5 bar) + (1.013 bar)

Pabs = 5.513 bar

Example 8

Calculate the absolute pressure when the hydrostatic pressure is 6 bar. The atmospheric pressure that is taken into account is the standard one: 1,013 bar.

Pabs = H + Patm

Pabs = (6 bar) + (1.013 bar)

Pabs = 7.013 bar

Example 9

Calculate the absolute pressure when the gauge pressure is 400 millimeters of mercury. The atmospheric pressure that is taken into account is the standard: 760mmHg.

Pabs = Pman + Patm

Pabs = (400mmHg) + (760mmHg)

Pabs = 1160mmHg

Example 10

Calculate the absolute pressure when the gauge pressure is 320 millimeters of mercury. The atmospheric pressure that is taken into account is the standard: 760mmHg.

Pabs = Pman + Patm

Pabs = (3200mmHg) + (760mmHg)

Pabs = 1080mmHg

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